I Call MORE Bullshit on Julie Bindel’s Attack on Sex Workers!

If you haven’t read the last piece that I’ve written that counter-attacks Julie Bindel’s claim that decriminalisation won’t protect sex workers, you should read it first and come back to this article once you’re done.

Young happy couple enjoying bath in the jacuzzi - Couple of lovers kissing in a jacuzzi pool

If you have already read it, then I should let you know that the ‘feminisit activist, research fellow, and full-on lezzer’ (this is how she describes herself on twitter) has written another article about the Nordic Model, but in a voice that shouts out ‘misandry’ in the text.

Before I carry on, yes, there are many things that still need to be changed, such as the regulations, health and safety procedures, and the stigmatisation that sex workers have to deal with. However, we mustn’t disregard the fact that there are people that enjoy working in the sex trade, and want to continue working within the industry without sacrificing their autonomy, or ‘dignity’ as some people would like to put it. To me, telling a sex worker that people don’t like or accept your profession, would be the same as telling an artist that people don’t like or accept him or her making artwork for a living. Could you see a difference in concept?

In Bindel’s other article, ‘Selling sex should be decriminalised – but we still need to crack down on buyers’, There’s a paragraph that states, ‘Those in prostitution should be decriminalised. But the men – and it’s almost always men – who create the demand and pay for sex should be criminalised’. Not only does Bindel want to deplete the sex worker’s revenue, but she also wants the sex buyers to be severely penalised for paying for what they want; specifically the male sex buyers. I definitely smell some kind of misandry here.

Once again, I’m calling out the journalist’s bullshit claims and show the readers that her mandate to end prostitution is her own, and a few other women’s moral obligation, not the obligation of the majority of women.

‘The report wrongly claims that the Nordic Model is “based on the premise that prostitution is morally wrong and should, therefore, be illegal, whereas at present the law makes no such moral judgement”.

Just because the model only decriminalises the wholesale of sex, doesn’t mean that it doesn’t have a moral judgement. If it didn’t, it would have decriminalised, or even legalised all of the enactments in sex work. Additionally, we have to look at the knock-on effect of the model. There are other journalists and academics that claimed the opposite of what Bindel is portraying about the Nordic Model.

Cas Mudde, Associate Professor in the School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Georgia, wrote her views about the Nordic Model on the Huffington Post, where she states that the prostitution law depicts that ‘the alleged “harm” is the act of sex work itself,’ and that the ‘real argument seems to be that sexuality is something “personal”.’ It’s statements like this that make people wonder what laws and enactments are based on personal preferences…

‘We fight to abolish the sex trade not because we are religious nutjobs, anti-sex prudes or moral crusaders, but because prostitution is both a cause and a consequence of women’s oppression.’

I want to bring up something that Bindel has mentioned in her piece on the Guardian. She stated, if not implied, that the decriminalisation of sex work and prostitution has failed in New Zealand, where she provides a link to an article about the death of a sex worker as evidence. However, the writer’s claim about the decriminalisation in New Zealand can be debunked from the anecdotes, essays and statistics that are found, which also include points on where they can improve the laws on prostitution in the country.

You see? Even ‘the best country to work as a prostitute’ has its flaws, but that hasn’t caused them to switch to the Nordic Model which can cause more harm than good to the trade, health and safety of the workers. If you’re looking for statements in England that are against the Nordic Model, you should read Dean Kirby’s warning that the criminalization of clients and punters would reduce the safety of sex work on the Independent.

Where is the oppression?

‘For many years I have been trying to persuade the ‘other side’ – the so-called sex workers’ rights movement – to work alongside us abolitionists to campaign to change the law in this respect.’

If Bindel is going to create a debate on the ‘other side’, she should really name the campaigns and organisations that are against her claim; campaigns and organisations like:

The New Zealand Prostitutes’ Collective
The Sex Workers Alliance Ireland
The International Union of Sex Workers
The UK Network of Sex Work Projects
The Scottish Prostitutes Education Project
The Scarlet Alliance
Magenta
Ugly Mugs
The Street Worker Outreach Project WA (this organisation supports and promotes the health and safety of street-based sex workers).

The reason why organisations like these have been blacklisted by Bindel is because they don’t have her vision. They want to eliminate the stigma that sex workers face, and legitimise the trade so that proper health and safety can be implied. Not every escort, prostitute, erotic masseuse or dominatrix has seen the sex industry in a bad light.

‘Brooks-Gordon is fond of arguing that the Nordic Model is favoured by lesbians because we want to avoid men altogether.’

Hmm, sounds like Bindel wants to play the victim whenever other people don’t agree with the abolishment of sex work.Yes, Brooks-Gordon has made the correlation between the Nordic Model and the lesbian feminism ideology, but you can’t cry over facts and statistics. She explains the importance of basing policies on evidence and not emotions in articles like this one. By the way, I’m not a fan of labelling sexual orientations because I believe we are all people with different appeals, not things that place themselves in a box that’s filled with what society tells them what they could only like.

However, Bindel already gave the impression that sex workers should avoid men all together, where she stated that it’s ‘almost always men, who create the demand and pay for sex, should be criminalised’. There’s an implication that only women who like other women can say that they want to avoid men, but women who like men (I don’t know about Brooks-Gordon’s preferences) can’t. Maybe I should create a poll asking all of the homosexual ladies whether they do actually favour the Nordic Model and why?

‘Violent men rarely present as monsters.’

Violent women rarely present as monsters. Violent teenagers rarely present as monsters. Violent people rarely present as monsters.

This is what I mean when it comes to the misandrist’s outlook on the sex trade situation. Scaremongering the sex workers are another tactic that abolitionists, like Bindel, would use to get rid of what they want to see abolished. In this case, it is prostitution and the sex trade. She’s pulling straws here.

Further thoughts on Bindel’s agenda

It’s obvious that the writer wants to push a law that will criminalise all sex work under the guise that Nordic Model will support people that want to leave prostitution or the sex industry. The article that has been published on the Politics website expresses a voice that’s more aggressive than the one in the article, which explains why I’ve stated that I couldn’t help but smell the misandry from the screen, as well as the bitter dislike against organisations and personalities that support sex work.

Of course, there are more points that I want to bring up that counter-attack Bindel’s claims, but right now, I only want to show you that there are organizations that actually protect women, that there are sex workers that do not feel oppressed by the industry, and that not every violent person has a cock.

Zoe Jaspers
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Zoe Jaspers

Zoe Jaspers has worked in the adult industry for over a year, but she has already gained a fantastic reputation in the field. As a writer, she is passionate about bringing the reader some of the most interesting blog content around.

She is possibly most famous for her erotic stories, but is equally adept at giving top quality sex advice, all the time bringing in her 'personal experiences'.

When she isn't sharing her most intimate encounters, Zoe keeps herself active by watching videos on Youtube, and listening to music.
Zoe Jaspers
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One thought on “I Call MORE Bullshit on Julie Bindel’s Attack on Sex Workers!”

  1. As I thought, she is a fucking feminist so what do you expect.
    If she really was on the side of women, then she would support sex work, a many of these girls want to do what they are doing, plus they get to see me 😀

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